Change Whisperer – Gail Severini, Symphini Change Management Inc.


Insights in Change Management—Interview with James G. Bohn, Ph.D., Johnson Controls (Part 3 of 3)

Who do you seek out when you are faced with something new? Someone who has done it before, of course. Leading and managing change is fraught with risk—nuanced, contextual, dynamic, and difficult to decipher. Judgment is acquired over time and experience. It is a rare opportunity to speak with a seasoned practitioner in change management and get his or her insights.

This is the final post in the interview series with James G. Bohn, Ph.D., Director, Global Change Management Office, Johnson Controls. For Part 1 please click here; for Part 2 click here.

8.       Inspirations and Aspirations—Who inspires you? Individuals you work with? Do you mentor others? Do pro bono work? Writing? Networking?

Albert Bandura has been my inspiration for nearly 20 years. What I like about him is that his research is readable. I think in many ways it is humanistic. It has helped people in many ways. His work on looking at human freedom from a cognitive point of perspective is just amazing. It’s just fun to read and he is such an iconoclast. He is my number-one read and I’ve even got my daughter, who is a lawyer, reading him as well. 
continue reading here



Insights in Change Management—Interview with James G. Bohn, Ph.D., Johnson Controls (Part 2 of 3)

Change Management practitioners are in the fray of turning strategy into ROI. This often feels like nailing Jell-O on the wall but seasoned practitioners have insights that the rest of us can benefit from.

This is a continuation of the interview with James G. Bohn, Ph.D., Director Global Change Management Office, Johnson Controls. For Part 1 please click here. Part 3 will be published shortly. You can subscribe to ensure that you don’t miss it.
continue reading here



Insights in Change Management—Interview with James G. Bohn, Ph.D., Johnson Controls (Part 1 of 3)

Who knows more about change management than practitioners in the trenches? These are professionals who are vested in helping organizations achieve the promises to the Board (the strategy, “the change”) and who have dedicated their careers to figuring out how to do this well. In this series, Insights in Change Management, we will hear the voices of these professionals.

Jim Bohn is a seasoned change management practitioner with deep experience in facilitation, diagnostics, and coaching. He currently works on innovation, development, and standardization at Johnson Controls as Director, Global Change Management Office. He has managed large-scale client transitions ranging from pharmaceuticals to industrial and technology operations. Jim’s projects have ranged from mergers and acquisitions to large-scale IT change across North America, Mexico, Canada, the Caribbean, and Europe. You can find Jim on LinkedIn here and on his blog, The Impossible Art of Middle Management, here.

This interview comprises a series of questions and answers that will be published in three parts:

  1. Part 1—What brought you here? Includes: How did you get started? What’s your definition of change management? Where do you start?
  2. Part 2—Where is here for you? Includes: What do you bake into every engagement? What have you learned from failure? In SWOT analysis, what are the top three touchstones you refer to?
  3. Part 3—Who inspires you? Includes: What gets you up in the morning or keeps you going? What does the future of change management need? As a bonus, Jim answers the question, “What would you like to ask other practitioners?”

This is Part 1.  Parts 2 and 3 will be published shortly. You can subscribe to ensure that you don’t miss them.

Here we go….

1. Your story—How did you arrive at change management? Why did you choose this discipline and why?

Around about 1980, I received a flyer from University Associates, which at that time was one of the premier change management facilitation groups in the world. I was in product design at the time and always knew I wanted to work with people and help people adjust to change. What I had witnessed was that often people would flail through change but sometimes a good leader managed to help people through, whether it was through communications or just anticipating barriers. It was logical to me and I just couldn’t put my finger on it. I read the flyer and thought, “This is me—this is what I want to do.” In 1992 I had an opportunity to attend a conference and sit down with a magnificent practitioner and I was convinced. As I was working on my PhD and that set the direction for me. I went on to focus on human motivation. That moment set my goals for literally the next 20 years of my life.

continue reading here